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prensf2010:spheregen [2010/05/19 11:11]
scarl created
prensf2010:spheregen [2017/06/09 19:20] (current)
scarl
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 The fractal boundary traced out by the brownian motion of the spheres in Nel's CS 444 project is basically equivalent (I believe) to a sequence of random values generated by a 1/F (pink noise) or 1/​F<​sup>​2</​sup>​ (brownian noise) process. Various powers of f (Frequency) can be used and collectively are called Fractional Noise (or Fractal Noise), a term coined by Mandelbrot [1]. The fractal boundary traced out by the brownian motion of the spheres in Nel's CS 444 project is basically equivalent (I believe) to a sequence of random values generated by a 1/F (pink noise) or 1/​F<​sup>​2</​sup>​ (brownian noise) process. Various powers of f (Frequency) can be used and collectively are called Fractional Noise (or Fractal Noise), a term coined by Mandelbrot [1].
 +
  
 ==== Applied to SphereGen ==== ==== Applied to SphereGen ====
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   * Save the note values as Midi along with Wave/MP3 recording of the '​music'​   * Save the note values as Midi along with Wave/MP3 recording of the '​music'​
   * Timestamp saved information to make it possible to generate musical notation of a specific range of music   * Timestamp saved information to make it possible to generate musical notation of a specific range of music
 +[[prensf2010:​conceptSketches|Conceptual Sketches with Minim]]
 +
 +==Source and Project files==
 +There are currently two active repositories working with the 
 +Brownian/​Random concepts\\
 + ​[[http://​bitbucket.org/​scarl/​brownian-elements|Professor Carl'​s]]\\
 + ​[[http://​bitbucket.org/​cleverwhorl/​brownian-elements|Nels'​]]\\
 +
 +This is a composition tool combining OpenCV Processing and PD
 + ​[[http://​arthur.sewanee.edu/​oscarna0/​McG/​CVBlobber.zip|OpenCV Blob detection and Composition]]
  
 ==== Applied to iPhone as Orchestra === ==== Applied to iPhone as Orchestra ===
-   +The "​iPhone as Orchestra"​ idea is based on wireless/​Bluetooth connections between smart handheld devices in proximity to one another. ​ The first idea is implementing a master/​slave architecture where the first device to begin generating a sequence transmits to all others, which employ a Pd-inspired algorithm to generate harmonization. ​ Again, we need to start simply. ​ Some ideas:
-The "​iPhone as Orchestra"​ idea is based on wireless/​Bluetooth connections between smart handheld devices in proximity to one another. ​ The first idea is implementing a master/​slave architecture where the first device to begin generating a sequence transmits to all others, which employ a Pd-inspired algorithm to generate harmonization. ​ Again, we need to  ​+
  
-See [4][5] for more about experimental ensembles such as Stanford'​s **MoPho**+  * Simply echo the original sequenceusing some delay 
 +  ​Use delay or timestamps to do a "​round"​ (like Row, Row, Row your Boat) 
 +  ​Use full-blown interactive algorithmic composition to generate the new voices
  
 +Other ensemble ideas using mobile devices are the PLORK, L2Ork, and iPhone Orchestras. ​ See [4], [5] for video clips about Stanford'​s experimental ensembles **MoPho**. ​
 +
 +=====References=====
 [1] Algorithmic composition:​ paradigms of automated music generation [1] Algorithmic composition:​ paradigms of automated music generation
  By Gerhard Nierhaus, online at [[http://​books.google.com/​books?​id=jaowAtnXsDQC&​printsec=frontcover#​v=onepage&​q&​f=false|Google Books]]  By Gerhard Nierhaus, online at [[http://​books.google.com/​books?​id=jaowAtnXsDQC&​printsec=frontcover#​v=onepage&​q&​f=false|Google Books]]
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 [2] Algorithmic Composition:​ A Gentle Introduction to Music Composition Using Common LISP and Common Music by Mary Simoni, online at [[http://​quod.lib.umich.edu/​cgi/​t/​text/​text-idx?​c=spobooks;​idno=bbv9810.0001.001;​rgn=div2;​view=text;​cc=spobooks;​node=bbv9810.0001.001%3A18.5|UMich Scholarly Monograph Series]] and following. [2] Algorithmic Composition:​ A Gentle Introduction to Music Composition Using Common LISP and Common Music by Mary Simoni, online at [[http://​quod.lib.umich.edu/​cgi/​t/​text/​text-idx?​c=spobooks;​idno=bbv9810.0001.001;​rgn=div2;​view=text;​cc=spobooks;​node=bbv9810.0001.001%3A18.5|UMich Scholarly Monograph Series]] and following.
  
-[3] Search ​Google ​using "​algorithmic composition 1/f" for some choice links, ​especially ​Bruce Jacob+[3] [[http://​www.google.com/​search?​q=algorithmic+composition+1%2Ff&​ie=utf-8&​oe=utf-8&​aq=t&​rls=org.mozilla:​en-US:​official&​client=firefox-a|Google "​algorithmic composition 1/f" for choice links, ​like Bruce Jacob]]
  
 [4] [[http://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=kfrONZjakRY&​feature=related|Stanford'​s Mobile Phone Orchestra]] [4] [[http://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=kfrONZjakRY&​feature=related|Stanford'​s Mobile Phone Orchestra]]
  
 [5] [[http://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=kfrONZjakRY&​feature=related|iPhone App by Smule: Ocarina (Stairway to Heaven)]] [5] [[http://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=kfrONZjakRY&​feature=related|iPhone App by Smule: Ocarina (Stairway to Heaven)]]
 +
 +[6] [[http://​web.archive.org/​web/​20070712122324/​http://​www.sonicspace.org:​80/​ver4/​algorithmic.htm|40hz Studio for history and a good Bibliography]]
prensf2010/spheregen.1274285503.txt.gz · Last modified: 2010/05/19 11:11 by scarl