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tracy444a:paper_summaries [2010/10/18 21:40]
tracyam0
tracy444a:paper_summaries [2010/11/05 16:36] (current)
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 ====== Paper Summaries!! ====== ====== Paper Summaries!! ======
 +
 +11/05/10
 +----
 +Mathematical Games: White and brown music, fractal curves and one-over-f fluctuations. Gardner, Martin.
 +Scientific American, 1978.
 +
 +Garnder spends a great deal of time philosophizing over why fractal curves are interesting and important. When he finishes discussing Plato and program music he begins describing white and brown music, as well as 1/f fluctuations. He describes an algorithm which generates pseudo 1/f fluctuations (which Kirby borrows with only minor alterations and is described below in the summary of his paper). This algorithm comes from Voss, who notes that music generated from the pseudo 1/f algorithm is indistinguishable from real 1/f music.
 +
 +10/28/10 (Approximately).
 +----
 +
 +Evolving electroacoustic music: the application of genetic algorithms to time-domain waveforms. Magnus, Cristyn.
 +
 +The paper discusses fairly typical approach to genetic algorithms. Magnus focuses on wave forms. She defines gene segments to be the space between zero crossings of the wave form so that "​sexual reproduction"​ and "​mutation"​ techniques can be applied meaningfully. She also chooses a "​target"​ waveform to act as her fitness function. Of course, using a specific target function with a genetic algorithm will cause the sample wave forms to converge to a local minimum where they all approximate the target reasonably well. To solve this problem, Magnus focuses on the parallels to biology. She divides the waveforms of her "​population"​ into separate "​locations"​ where each location has a different target function. However, the individual waveforms are individually allowed to move from location to location and "​interbreed"​ with the waveforms at the new location. Her end result, is to concatenate all the waveforms created during the process into one sound file.
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 10/18/10 10/18/10
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 The process is (roughly) as follows: The process is (roughly) as follows:
  
-(1)Decide on "how many" random number generators (Garder used 3, Kirby used 5). +  - Decide on "how many" random number generators (Garder used 3, Kirby used 5). 
-(2)Choose how many notes you want in your tune. +  ​- ​Choose how many notes you want in your tune. 
-(3)List these numbers in binary, starting with zero. The number of digits must be the same as the number of generators chosen in step (1). +  ​- ​List these numbers in binary, starting with zero. The number of digits must be the same as the number of generators chosen in step (1). 
-(4) "​Assign"​ a generator to each digit. +  ​- ​"​Assign"​ a generator to each digit. 
-(5) Use each generator to generate a random number and add them together. Then use a predetermined system to assign the sum to a note frequency. +  ​- ​Use each generator to generate a random number and add them together. Then use a predetermined system to assign the sum to a note frequency. 
-(6) For each subsequent note, examine the binary number. For each digit that is a one, take the corresponding number generator and generate a new number to replace the old one in the sum. Now assign the new resulting sum to a new note frequency.+  ​- ​For each subsequent note, examine the binary number. For each digit that is a one, take the corresponding number generator and generate a new number to replace the old one in the sum. Now assign the new resulting sum to a new note frequency.
  
  
tracy444a/paper_summaries.1287456057.txt.gz · Last modified: 2010/10/18 21:40 by tracyam0